Author Topic: Planetary phases  (Read 1060 times)

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AB

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Re: Planetary phases
« Reply #15 on: May 22, 2021, 03:30:07 PM »
I'm glad I could help!
If you would consider my advice I would also recommend changing the daytime visibility of the planets.
There are two planets and the Moon that are visible during the daytime, of these Venus and the Moon are visible during high-noon as well. These are the rules that should stand true for the most part for these three.

Moon: when the Moon is about 30 degrees removed from the Sun it appears to us as a slim crescent that is easy to observe with the naked eye either before sunrise or after sunset, but, it is actually visible during the entire day as long as it is above the horizon with about +2 degrees and the sky is clear.
The reason you need those 30 degrees or so in elongation from the Sun is in order to easily observe it, due to the light saturation around the Sun and the fact that bellow that elongation the crescent is really thin against the bright daytime sky. 

Venus is also visible during the entire day time, but this is especially true when she is occidental and helically setting as an evening star at the same time and when she is oriental and helically rising as a morning star at the same time. More precisely, when she is helically setting as an evening star from when she reaches the 45 degrees on her way towards the sun down to when she is 30 degrees removed from the Sun still as an evening star. Within this 15 degrees window her apparent size and brightness are both large enough to make her easy to see during the daytime. As long as her altitude above the horizon does not fall bellow +5 degrees. Equally when she helically rises as a morning star, form when she is 30 degrees moving away from the sun in longitude up to when she is 45 degrees away (but still helically rising) she is visible during the day time, again in terms of her minimum altitude the same +5 degrees above the horizon applies.

Jupiter is also visible during the day, but only shorty after sunrise and shortly before sunset at times when he is at his perihelion, while being removed in longitude from the Sun by about 90 degrees.
The rule is the following.
Jupiter oriental in Pisces, when the Sun is in Gemini, and the Sun is not more than +3 degrees above the horizon after sunrise.
Jupiter oriental in Aries, the Sun in Cancer, and -//-
Jupiter occidental in Pisces, when the Sun is in Sagittarius, and the Sun is not more than +3 degrees above the horizon before sunset.
Jupiter occidental in in Aries, the Sun in Capricorn, and -//-

And with Jupiter there is a special rule that makes him visible throughout the day while he is in the same signs and configuration to the Sun, as stated above, as long as he is conjunct the half-Moon within 7 degrees or so in longitude.
Then the rule is the following (and I'll just give one example that holds true for all four combinations detailed above):
Jupiter oriental in Pisces, when the Sun is in Gemini, the Moon within 7 degrees from Jupiter, and Jupiter above +10 degrees altitude.
The Moon in this case facilitates the location of Jupiter in the bright daytime sky and guides the eye. Without her you would not be able to locate him with the naked eye once the Sun has risen +3 degrees above the horizon.

Hope this helps.
For those of us that have diurnal charts this data set can actually be rather important.